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Spectrum Engineering Reports

NOTE: These reports are available either on-line in PDF (portable document) format or only as hard-copy. If you would like a copy of a report that is not available electronically, please make note of the document number and submit your request to:

NTIA Office of Spectrum Management
System Engineering and Analysis Division
Tel. (202) 482-2608
Fax (202) 482-4595
e-mail edrocella@ntia.gov

Measured and Predicted Long-Term Distributions of Tropospheric Transmission Loss

Report ID
OT/TRER 16
July 01, 1971
A. G. Longley, R. K. Reasoner, V. L. Fuller
Abstract

This report summarizes measurements of tropospheric transmission loss and its long-term variability for nearly 800 paths in various parts of the world. The measurements were made at frequencies from 40 MHz to 10 GHz over distances which range from 10 to 1000 km. Terrain profiles and cumulative distributions of both observed and predicted losses are plotted for more than 500 of these paths. A preliminary analysis of differences between observed and predicted values is included.


Key Words: Cumulative distributions, location variability, long-term variability, measurements, predictions, tropospheric propagation.

A Survey of Microwave Fading Mechanisms Remedies and Applications

Report ID
ERL 69-WPL 4
March 01, 1969
H. T. Dougherty
Abstract

After a brief description of the significance of the radio refractive index and its variation in the lower troposphere, a catalog of fading mechanisms is presented. Attention is directed to the supporting refractive index structure, the characteristics of the fading signal, and the available remedies. The phenomena of multipath fading are described, and the theoretical amplitude distributions are presented. Diversity reception (frequency or space) is outlined for reducing the fading due to multipath. Specific expressions are given for determining the frequency or space separations. Successful remedies for microwave fading that are keyed to specific fading mechanisms also constitute a means of measuring the characteristics of the prevailing meteorological conditions. Specific expressions are given to accomplish this for the multipath and diffraction fading mechanisms.

Tabulations of Propagation Data Over Irregular Terrain in the 230-to 9200-MHz Frequency Range Part II: Fritz Peak Receiver Site

Report ID
ERL 65-ITS 58-2
December 01, 1968
P. L. McQuate, J. M. Harman, M. E. Johnson, A. P. Barsis
Abstract

This is the second part of a four-part report containing tabulations and graphs of transmission loss data resulting from propagation experiments in the 230 to 9200 MHz frequency range conducted over irregular terrain in Colorado. This part describes data obtained at a single common receiver site at Fritz Peak, Colorado, over propagation paths varying in length from 3.0 to 120 km.

Tabulations of Propagation Data Over Irregular Terrain in the 230 to 9200 MHz Frequency Range Part III: North Table Mountain-Golden

Report ID
ESSA Technical Report ERL 65-ITS 58-3
July 01, 1970
P. L. McQuate, J. M. Harman, M. E. McClanahan, A. P. Barsis
Abstract

This is the third part of a four-part report containing tabulations and graphs of transmission loss data resulting from propagation experiments in the 230- to 9200- MHz frequency range conducted over irregular terrain in Colorado. This part describes data obtained at a common receiver site, which is located on a high mesa near Golden, Colorado, over propagation paths varying in length from 0.5 to 80 km.

UHF Radio Propagation Data for Low Antenna Heights: Volume I

Report ID
ESSA Technical Report ERL 134-ITS 93-1
November 01, 1969
L. G. Hause, F. G. Kimmett, J. M. Harman
Abstract

This report is a presentation in two volumes of measurement techniques, data, comparisons, and conclusions obtained from a UHF propagation measurement program at 230 and 415.9 MHz. Antenna heights were 3 m or less above ground. Vertical polarization was used, and the antennas were omnidirectional in the horizontal plane. The terrain was generally rocky, hilly, and relatively free of trees. Path lengths varied from 2 to 45 km. Volume 1 describes the equipment, techniques, and results and presents data from the Wyoming area, including some buried antenna tests. Volume II presents data obtained in Idaho and Washington.

Meteor Burst System Communications Compatibility

Report ID
NTIA Report 89-241
March 01, 1989
David Cohen, William Grant, & Francis Steele
Abstract

The technical and operating characteristics of meteor burst systems of importance for spectrum management applications are identified. A technical assessment is included, which identifies the most appropriate frequency subbands within the VHF spectrum to support meteor burst systems. The electromagnetic compatibility of meteor burst systems with other equipments in the VHF spectrum is determined using computerized analysis methods for both ionospheric and groundwave propagation modes. It is shown that meteor burst equipments can cause and are susceptible to groundwave interference from other VHF equipments. The report inThe technical and operating characteristics of meteor burst systems of importance for spectrum management applications are identified. A technical assessment is included, which identifies the most appropriate frequency subbands within the VHF spectrum to support meteor burst systems. The electromagnetic compatibility of meteor burst systems with other equipments in the VHF spectrum is determined using computerized analysis methods for both ionospheric and groundwave propagation modes. It is shown that meteor burst equipments can cause and are susceptible to groundwave interference from other VHF equipments. The report includes tables of geographical distance separations between meteor burst and other VHF equipments which satisfy interference threshold criteria.cludes tables of geographical distance separations between meteor burst and other VHF equipments which satisfy interference threshold criteria.

Sixth Annual Progress Report on the Relocation of Federal Radio Systems from the 1710-1755 MHz Spectrum Band

April 04, 2013

Section 207 of the Commercial Spectrum Enhancement Act (CSEA), Title II of P.L. 108-494 requires annual reporting on federal agencies’ progress to vacate certain wireless communications systems from the 1710 megahertz (MHz) to 1755 MHz radio spectrum that has been reallocated to commercial use. NTIA published the first annual report to Congress on April 17, 2008. That report covered relocation activity occurring over the period March 2007 through December 2007.

Report to the President: Identification of 15 MHz of Spectrum Between 1675 MHz and 1710 MHz for Reallocation

February 19, 2013

As directed by Congress in Section 6401(a)(3) of the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 (Tax Relief Act), NTIA submitted a report to the President identifying 15 megahertz of spectrum between 1675 MHz and 1710 MHz for reallocation from federal use to non-federal use. 

Evaluation of the 5350-5470 MHz and 5850-5925 MHz Bands

January 25, 2013
Abstract

Through this report, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) presents the results of its initial study on the potential use of up to 195 megahertz of spectrum in the 5 gigahertz (GHz) band by Unlicensed-National Information Infrastructure (U-NII) devices. Pursuant to Section 6406(b)(1) of the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 (Tax Relief Act), NTIA, in consultation with the Department of Defense and other impacted agencies, assessed known and proposed spectrum-sharing technologies. This study also evaluated the risk to federal users if the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) allows U-NII devices to operate in the 5350-5470 MHz and 5850-5925 MHz bands.